Experts have finally agreed on how sexual intercourse works, despite all warnings

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a baby lying on a white blanket

After months of breastfeeding and trying to put her baby to bed in her bassinet, Toronto mother Kate Galt was extremely tired. Nothing was working. When Elliot passed the bassinet at the age of three months, Galt tried to train him sleeping in his cave, but he always seemed to be having sex with her in bed at night. That’s where he seemed very happy and stable.

The truth is that Galt used to sleep next to Elliot, too. “When I sleep with her at night, I feel close to her,” she says. As a child, he shared a bed with his sister, and sleeping near his loved ones at night felt natural to him. He said: “I have had sex with people. “It hurts me to put a baby in bed alone. I don’t want to go to bed alone either! ”

But North American experts and doctors agree not to have sex with a child. Both the Canadian Pediatric Society (CPS) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) have been advising new parents not to fall asleep, warning them of the dangers and risks of asthma, as well as the increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

But when parents want to sleep for only a few hours, they share a bed. Anyone who has brought their baby to bed at 3 a.m. knows how easy it is to fall asleep while breastfeeding, with the baby in your arms, whether you mean it or not.

A recent-update a coherent sentence for the safe birth of a baby, published by CPS and Health Canada last month, it agrees with the experience of many parents: One in three Canadian women report being bedridden all the time, and one third say that they do so occasionally. Many Canadian parents sleep sometime regardless of technology, and despite good intentions. The new statement highlights that fact.

“We knew we needed to talk to the elephant in the room,” said April Kam, a CPS consultant and pediatrician based in Hamilton, Ont.

In the end, Kam says the safest place for babies to sleep is in the bedroom, bed or couch, because sharing a bed increases the risk of breathing and extreme heat. It is the job of the CPS to clarify where the risks of SIDS are, says Kam, but it is up to the parents to decide what works best for their families, and the more information parents have, the better. This is why the integrated sentence was changed to include behaviors, and family events that could put children off. many at risk. According to these new words, these risks “are especially severe for infants less than 4 months old, or if the fetus is premature or preterm.” But iIf you are still sharing a bed, there are steps you can take to reduce the risk.

If you can, breastfeed for at least two months

Studies show that breastfeeding has been shown to reduce the risk of SIDS, says Kam. “Breastfeeding for at least two months is a protection, and the longer you breastfeed, the more protective it is, at some point.” When co-sleeping, however, Kam points out the benefits of breastfeeding or eating on the chest do not ignore the serious dangers of sharing a bed.

James McKenna, California anthropologist and author Best Sleeping for Children, says mothers who sleep close to their babies can be completely safe and safe for the baby as long as the parents are careful. McKenna, founder of the Maternal and Child Sleep Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame, studies the body and behavior of sleeping mothers with infants. Her research has led her to conclude that “the best place for a baby to be found in a nursing home.” He is not saying this shame that can’t suck, or breast-feeding — closely related to the science of infant sleep and wakefulness.

During the first three months, when babies are most susceptible to SIDS, all babies like to have a bedtime period that stops shortness of breath. This is normal. When breastfeeding infants fall asleep next to their mothers, they “wake up all night long and begin the process of waking up,” she explains. “She’s doing very well.” In contrast, McKenna and colleagues found that infants who do not wake up are often more likely to be deprived of sleep.

“There are all these ideas that ‘good’ baby it’s a baby that sleeps all night and sleeps soundly, and that’s not true, ”says McKenna. “What makes the engagement between mother and baby so important is the constant transition between sleep patterns and arousal mechanisms that supply the baby with oxygen.”

Continuing this awakening process, McKenna and its researchers have seen this breastfeeding mothers sleeping in a place called C.

“Many mothers lie on their side with the baby under the triceps on the chest, lifting their legs under the baby’s feet,” says McKenna. The system provides protection from wandering, compared to non-breastfeeding infants, who prefer to sleep on a pillow, rather than face their mother. (Note that pillows should be removed from the same bed.)

Be alcoholics and non-smokers

Exposure to secondhand smoke during and after childbirth is not the only problem – it greatly affects your baby’s brain function, explains McKenna. Smokeless drugs damage the arousal area in the brain that allows the baby to learn to breathe well throughout the night, and this increases the risk of SIDS.

“Smoking and sharing in bed appear to have a coherent effect,” states CPS. “SIDS is much higher among infants who have sex with an adult smoker, or whose mother smokes during pregnancy.”

These new words also indicate that drinking before birth and continuing to drink, opioids and other factors (not just nicotine), are all associated with an increased risk of SIDS, especially in bed sharing. “All mothers and fathers should be careful not to get sidetracked by drugs or alcohol,” says McKenna.

If you sleep together, make a safe place to sleep

Kam emphasizes the need not to put the baby to bed in a soft spot with loose sheets, which have large beds. This means no blankets, no pillows, no duvets, no nursing pillows, and no bumps. Sturdy mattress with tight paper is the only option. (No water beds, air mattresses, and high mattresses, either.)

The side rooms that connect to the bed, or the bedrooms along with the lower side, are no longer recommended, as babies can be locked in the spaces between the bed, mattress and sleeping partner. (Instead, such items are not available in Canada.)

And avoid the whole idea of ​​a “family bed”, too, adds Kam. Sharing a bed with other adults, older children and pets increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. The best way to sleep together is to reduce the bed for the mother and baby.

When Galt decided to start hug sleep, he wanted to make sure that they were doing this very carefully. “I read everything and made sure that nothing was wrong. We did not drink or smoke. Elliot slept soundly, without blankets, and I slept, ”he says.

Finally, do not lie on a chair or chair with your baby in your arms, on your chest, or sitting next to you. “Sleeping in a chair or chair is always dangerous,” says McKenna.

What about sleeping with a covered baby?

A good sleeping bag is ideal for sleeping together, but not sharing a bed with a covered baby. Modified terms from CPS also include emphasis on hugging does not reduce the risk of SIDS. Instead, Kam says sneezing can be dangerous at times.

Regardless of where you put your baby, “do not put a baby on its side or on its belly, and leave the sling if the baby shows signs of rolling, ”says Kam. The cloth should also be protected away from the baby’s mouth or nose, close to the shoulders, and not tied around the chin or face. If you use a a blanket like a cloth, choose lightweight so as not to overheat the baby.

Can pacifiers help keep safe roommates safe?

Yes, they can. There is evidence that once established, breastfeeding can help keep babies safe, as breastfeeding stimulates reflex respiration and reduces the chances of a baby being born, according to Kam.

Is sharing a room better than sharing a bed?

Sharing rooms is a good, safe way to keep babies close to their parents all night, but not in the same bed, says Kam. (You can do this with the bassinet, traveler’s child or a fixed bed, if you have space in your bedroom. Or, some families choose to place large mattresses in the baby’s room.) Sharing in the room is associated with a lower risk of SIDS and is recommended for the first six months of life. Because SIDS is at risk between two and four months, and rarely between the ages of 6 and 12 months, parents can relax a little while their children grow up.

“Like most aspects of parenting, as a child grows older, you can continue to change and change as he or she grows older,” says Kam. When your baby learns to roll over, for example, you can be a little stressed out by making sure he sleeps on his back – let him sleep on his stomach if he comes on his own.

Finally, there are a number of factors that affect safety and the raising or lowering of a child’s risk. It is possible to make bed sharing safe, but still have a high risk of SIDS. Remember that the best way to sleep together is between a smokeless breastfeeding mother and her baby, in a sturdy, blanket. Any miscarriage increases the risk of infant death, says Kam.

He likes to use the metaphor for cycling safety: “Think of all the safety features we put on our bikes. He says parents should do their best every day, and his job is just to make sure they are as well trained as possible for reasons that can lead to problems.

The baby Elliot is now two years old, still sharing with his mother. “I only see him for an hour or two in the morning and night, so sleeping is the longest time we spend together most days,” says Galt. She has been sold out for sex now and will continue with her future children. “I know it’s forbidden,” she said. “I thought we should exercise, because that’s the ‘right’ thing to do. But the first few months are a wonderful hell. And if you do research on sleeping together, it can happen safely, in my opinion, and make everyone relax.”

Note Experts have finally agreed on how sexual intercourse works, despite all warnings appeared for the first time Parents Today.



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